Or phone direct & SAVE! 
1800 248 231
Or phone direct & SAVE! 
1800 248 231
BORANUP FOREST
Boranup Forrrest, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

For scenic driving through the tall timber forests of the south west head to Boranup Karri Forest just south of Margaret River.

The area, which is part of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park, is also well known for its wildflowers that colour the forest floor during spring.

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Boranup Karri Forest is unique for its proximity to the coast. This is the furthest west that the tall pale-barked karri trees grow. Karris can reach 60 metres or more in height and cover the hilly slopes and valleys of the forest.

There’s a stunning scenic drive through the forest which is suitable for convention vehicles. You’ll feel dwarfed by the massive trees that line the road.

A short walk takes you to Boranup Lookout, which gives sweeping views of the forest and the coast. There are several spots to stop for a barbecue or picnic and there’s a camp ground at the southern end of Boranup Drive.

You can access Boranup Forest from Caves Road, a short drive south of Margaret River.

BUSSELTON FORESHORE
Busselton Foreshore, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The life of the city is fuelled by the 1.8 kilometre long Busselton Jetty and the amazing waterfront precinct which has developed around it.

With the jetty as a focal point, the waterfront is brimming with activity. Seaside cafes, kiosks, bars and restaurants give way to bike paths, large shady grassed areas and a calm tranquil white sandy beach. Take a walk or train ride to the end of the Busselton Jetty to the Underwater Observatory where you can see amazing marine life.

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The bustling main street has a cosmopolitan atmosphere with superb alfresco restaurants, cafes and pubs and boutique shops.

As one of Western Australia’s favourite tourism towns and as the gateway to Your Margaret River’s premium wine region, tourism is at the heart of this seaside town. There’re so many things to do in Busselton.

CANAL ROCKS
Canal Rocks, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

Canal Rocks are a striking, dramatic geological feature on Margaret River’s Cape to Cape coast.

The Rocks are an ancient and unusual rock formation, extending from a peninsula south of Smiths Beach on the coastline between the towns of Yallingup and Margaret River.

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These massive banks of granitic gneiss have eroded along a dead-straight line running north – south, forming the striking “canal” feature. Several smaller canals cross perpendicular to the main canal.

In wild and stormy weather, massive waves smash against the rocks and churn through the canals. It’s a spectacular sight to see! You can even walk across a wooden bridge over the turbulent white water to an island of more orange granite on the other side of the first canal.

Canal Rocks is one of the most easily accessible places along the Cape-to-Cape coast where you can see dramatic outcrops of the older granitic rocks that form the base of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Ridge.

Dependent on the conditions of the day –

Walk out along the boardwalk and stand on the bridge as a big wave rushes underneath

Explore away from the boardwalk, scramble over the rocks and check out the rock pools, which are home to crabs and periwinkles

  • Marvel at the geology of Canal Rocks and the power of the ocean
  • Rock fishing
  • Swimming and jumping in off the rocks (in calm conditions)
  • Snorkeling (in even calmer conditions)
  • Scuba diving
  • Watch the sunset
BORANUP FOREST
Boranup Forrrest, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

For scenic driving through the tall timber forests of the south west head to Boranup Karri Forest just south of Margaret River.

The area, which is part of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park, is also well known for its wildflowers that colour the forest floor during spring.

READ MORE

Boranup Karri Forest is unique for its proximity to the coast. This is the furthest west that the tall pale-barked karri trees grow. Karris can reach 60 metres or more in height and cover the hilly slopes and valleys of the forest.

There’s a stunning scenic drive through the forest which is suitable for convention vehicles. You’ll feel dwarfed by the massive trees that line the road.

A short walk takes you to Boranup Lookout, which gives sweeping views of the forest and the coast. There are several spots to stop for a barbecue or picnic and there’s a camp ground at the southern end of Boranup Drive.

You can access Boranup Forest from Caves Road, a short drive south of Margaret River.

BUSSELTON FORESHORE
Busselton Foreshore, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The life of the city is fuelled by the 1.8 kilometre long Busselton Jetty and the amazing waterfront precinct which has developed around it.

With the jetty as a focal point, the waterfront is brimming with activity. Seaside cafes, kiosks, bars and restaurants give way to bike paths, large shady grassed areas and a calm tranquil white sandy beach. Take a walk or train ride to the end of the Busselton Jetty to the Underwater Observatory where you can see amazing marine life.

READ MORE

The bustling main street has a cosmopolitan atmosphere with superb alfresco restaurants, cafes and pubs and boutique shops.

As one of Western Australia’s favourite tourism towns and as the gateway to Your Margaret River’s premium wine region, tourism is at the heart of this seaside town. There’re so many things to do in Busselton.

CANAL ROCKS
Canal Rocks, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

Canal Rocks are a striking, dramatic geological feature on Margaret River’s Cape to Cape coast.

The Rocks are an ancient and unusual rock formation, extending from a peninsula south of Smiths Beach on the coastline between the towns of Yallingup and Margaret River.

READ MORE

These massive banks of granitic gneiss have eroded along a dead-straight line running north – south, forming the striking “canal” feature. Several smaller canals cross perpendicular to the main canal.

In wild and stormy weather, massive waves smash against the rocks and churn through the canals. It’s a spectacular sight to see! You can even walk across a wooden bridge over the turbulent white water to an island of more orange granite on the other side of the first canal.

Canal Rocks is one of the most easily accessible places along the Cape-to-Cape coast where you can see dramatic outcrops of the older granitic rocks that form the base of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Ridge.

Dependent on the conditions of the day –

Walk out along the boardwalk and stand on the bridge as a big wave rushes underneath

Explore away from the boardwalk, scramble over the rocks and check out the rock pools, which are home to crabs and periwinkles

  • Marvel at the geology of Canal Rocks and the power of the ocean
  • Rock fishing
  • Swimming and jumping in off the rocks (in calm conditions)
  • Snorkeling (in even calmer conditions)
  • Scuba diving
  • Watch the sunset
CAPE TO CAPE TRACK
Cape to Cape Track, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The Cape to Cape track meanders along the whole length of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Ridge, which forms the backbone of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park.

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Its start and finish are the lighthouses at the tips of Cape Naturaliste and Cape Leeuwin, following the coast, the track extends over 135 km of coastal scenery, sheltered forests and pristine beaches, and is in close proximity to the caves, vineyards and other features and attractions of The Margaret River Region.

The walk takes in amazing views of sea and landscapes including wildflowers in spring and the stunning Indian Ocean. However, you do not need to do the entire walk as short walks along the track are easily accessed and include some of the best highlights! Parts of the track are boardwalk or hard paved to allow access for all levels of fitness and abilities including those using wheelchairs and prams.

CAPE TO CAPE TRACK
Cape to Cape Track, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The Cape to Cape track meanders along the whole length of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Ridge, which forms the backbone of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park.

READ MORE

Its start and finish are the lighthouses at the tips of Cape Naturaliste and Cape Leeuwin, following the coast, the track extends over 135 km of coastal scenery, sheltered forests and pristine beaches, and is in close proximity to the caves, vineyards and other features and attractions of The Margaret River Region.

The walk takes in amazing views of sea and landscapes including wildflowers in spring and the stunning Indian Ocean. However, you do not need to do the entire walk as short walks along the track are easily accessed and include some of the best highlights! Parts of the track are boardwalk or hard paved to allow access for all levels of fitness and abilities including those using wheelchairs and prams.

CYCLE: BUSSELTON-DUNSBOROUGH
Busselton to Dunsborough Cycle Path, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

Located along the foreshore areas of Busselton and Dunsborough you can follow the sheltered beaches and crystal clear waters of Geographe Bay as you stroll or ride the path stretching from Busselton to Dunsborough. Bring your own bike, hire one from Mandalay or plenty of bike hire options available in both town centres.

READ MORE

The gently meandering coastal path is one of the most scenic trails in the region linking the two towns of Busselton and Dunsborough, plus cafés and eateries for over 31 kilometres.

Tackle the whole return trip with a breakfast or lunch stop in-between or simply stroll or ride your way along a number of shorter sections or scenic loops. Stop for a swim or snorkel, search for sun-baking Bobtails or spot dolphins at play in the bay.

This path is specially designed to be shared by commuting cyclists and pedestrians. It offers spectacular views from one end of Geographe Bay to the other, with plenty of rest stops along the way. Please note the maximum speed for commuting cyclists is 20km/h.

There are many access points or public parking bays along the path.

LUDLOW TUART FOREST
Ludlow Tuart Forest, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The narrow strip of tuart (Eucalyptus gomphocephala) forest that links Capel and Busselton is one of the special places of the South-West.

Do not miss the leisurely tourist drive through the Ludlow Tuart Forest to capture the beauty of these ‘rare giants of the forest’. This is the only natural stand of Tuart left in the world with many picnic spots and walk trails to soak up the peaceful beauty.

READ MORE

To see the tuart trees means diverting onto the overlooked old road … but it’s well worth the detour for anyone with an appreciation of Australia’s unique trees.

Tuart trees are native only to the coastal plain between Busselton and Jurien in the south west of Western Australia. They grow up to 40m high, live up to 500 years, and their stately grey trunks form an open forest different to others in the state. As with WA’s other tall forests, most have been cut down since Europeans settlement, leaving Ludlow Tuart Forest as the only surviving tuart forest anywhere.

For anyone travelling between Bunbury and Busselton, the detour through the tuarts takes only minutes longer than following the traffic on the highway, and is a more scenic option – even if you don’t stop, or aren’t wild about trees. Tree-huggers will be rewarded with the sight of some majestic old trees you can’t see anywhere else.

CYCLE: BUSSELTON-DUNSBOROUGH
Busselton to Dunsborough Cycle Path, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

Located along the foreshore areas of Busselton and Dunsborough you can follow the sheltered beaches and crystal clear waters of Geographe Bay as you stroll or ride the path stretching from Busselton to Dunsborough. Bring your own bike, hire one from Mandalay or plenty of bike hire options available in both town centres.

READ MORE

The gently meandering coastal path is one of the most scenic trails in the region linking the two towns of Busselton and Dunsborough, plus cafés and eateries for over 31 kilometres.

Tackle the whole return trip with a breakfast or lunch stop in-between or simply stroll or ride your way along a number of shorter sections or scenic loops. Stop for a swim or snorkel, search for sun-baking Bobtails or spot dolphins at play in the bay.

This path is specially designed to be shared by commuting cyclists and pedestrians. It offers spectacular views from one end of Geographe Bay to the other, with plenty of rest stops along the way. Please note the maximum speed for commuting cyclists is 20km/h.

There are many access points or public parking bays along the path.

LUDLOW TUART FOREST
Ludlow Tuart Forest, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The narrow strip of tuart (Eucalyptus gomphocephala) forest that links Capel and Busselton is one of the special places of the South-West.

Do not miss the leisurely tourist drive through the Ludlow Tuart Forest to capture the beauty of these ‘rare giants of the forest’. This is the only natural stand of Tuart left in the world with many picnic spots and walk trails to soak up the peaceful beauty.

READ MORE

To see the tuart trees means diverting onto the overlooked old road … but it’s well worth the detour for anyone with an appreciation of Australia’s unique trees.

Tuart trees are native only to the coastal plain between Busselton and Jurien in the south west of Western Australia. They grow up to 40m high, live up to 500 years, and their stately grey trunks form an open forest different to others in the state. As with WA’s other tall forests, most have been cut down since Europeans settlement, leaving Ludlow Tuart Forest as the only surviving tuart forest anywhere.

For anyone travelling between Bunbury and Busselton, the detour through the tuarts takes only minutes longer than following the traffic on the highway, and is a more scenic option – even if you don’t stop, or aren’t wild about trees. Tree-huggers will be rewarded with the sight of some majestic old trees you can’t see anywhere else.

MEELUP BEACH & REGIONAL PARK
Meelup Beach, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

Meelup Regional Park a Class A reserve in the City of Busselton. The park is approximately 577 hectares and extends 11.5 kilometres along the coastline from Dunsborough to Bunker Bay. The park’s coastline faces north east, which is rare in Western Australia, therefore it is sheltered from prevailing salt bearing south westerly winds, and so, in many places, tall trees and dense vegetation grows down to the water’s edge.

READ MORE

The Aboriginal name Meelup – “place of the moon rising” comes from the full moon appearing to rise out of the sea on a few days of the year. The park offers excellent recreation facilities among pristine coastal bushland and has a stunning visual landscape, due to its protected coastline and the stark contrast between the rustic granite outcrops and turquoise ocean.

Meelup Beach is a place that features in many happy holiday memories. The gentle calm water, spacious white sand beach and the big shady park with barbecues and picnic benches makes it a favourite spot for family picnics and swimming. It would be hard to find a beach more perfect for families with little kids!

On most days – especially hot summery days – Meelup Beach is completely sheltered from wind and waves. The water is crystal-clear and calm as a swimming pool. The white sandy seafloor slopes away gradually into the deeper water where you can anchor your boat, if you have one.

There is no vehicular access on beaches. Camping, pets, fires and off-road vehicles are not permitted. Gas barbeques are provided at Meelup Beach and Castle Bay.

QUINNINUP FALLS
Quinninup Falls, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The journey to Quinninup Falls is every bit as beautiful as the falls themselves but while the walk is very rewarding it can be somewhat physically challenging.

As a guide it takes approximately 45 minutes to walk to the falls and almost an hour to walk back, depending on your fitness level and age of your children. Also factor in time to spend exploring the falls.

READ MORE

To get to the falls park your car at the Moses Road carpark. On your left you will see toilets and a viewing platform and to the right is the path to the falls. At the start of the path there are three small wooden posts and some large bushes either side. As you are walking along keep a look out for the Cape to Cape Track signs, if you can see them you are going the right way!

The path to and from Quinninup Falls varies from flat and easy to rocky and uneven. There are also a few big sand dunes that are a breeze coming down, but physically challenging climbing up.

The view is breathtaking and well worth the effort. At the start of the walk you can see and hear the waves crashing against the shore and surfers enjoying the ocean. There is a bridge with a stream running underneath it, you then walk out into red dirt plane before the land dips and weaves and Quinninup Falls appears.

The sudden change between the ocean and sand dunes and the waterfall is almost surprising and a welcome contrast. One minute you can hear the wind and the waves crashing against the shore and then you step down into a small, quiet, green sanctuary and the sound of the rushing waterfall takes centre stage.

SUGARLOAF ROCK
Sugarloaf Rock, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

On the rugged coast a few kilometres south of Cape Naturaliste in the Margaret River Region, a gigantic granite rock-island looms up out of the ocean. As you approach Sugarloaf Rock you will instantly see why this towering, sea-sculptured rock that emerges from the Indian Ocean is one of the most photographed coastal landforms in the region.

READ MORE

The rock is situated within a designated nature reserve in the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park just off Cape Naturaliste near Dunsborough.

Sugarloaf Rock and the sometimes treacherous seas that pound it are best viewed from the platform. With its ever-changing colour, it is difficult to decide when it’s best to see it. Perhaps it is when the weather is stormy with crashing seas, perhaps it is when it is calm sunny and the water is crystal clear or perhaps the greatest sight is when the sun sets over the Indian Ocean and the colour of the rock changes every minute. If you wait long enough at sunset, you can even see the working Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse light up!

Its ocean side is battered by treacherous seas and the rock is separated from the coast by just a narrow channel of wild water. This has created a unique environment which is home to much wildlife.

The best place to view the rock and the crashing seas is from the elevated lookout. It is easy to get to the top with only approximately 20 steps. Due to the narrow channel of water you are quite close to the rock. But you can even get a good look from the car!

Take a closer look. Sugarloaf Rock is a bird watchers and nature lover’s paradise. As a nature reserve it is a haven for nesting sea birds and is home to the geographically restricted and graceful red-tailed tropic bird which nests here from September to February each year. But that’s not only the wildlife you may see. Playful bottlenose dolphins can often be seen leaping through the surf break close by, sometimes together with the surfers. Humpback and southern right whales are often seen wallowing, breeching or just cruising by on their migration (best time July-October)

MEELUP BEACH & REGIONAL PARK
Meelup Beach, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

Meelup Regional Park a Class A reserve in the City of Busselton. The park is approximately 577 hectares and extends 11.5 kilometres along the coastline from Dunsborough to Bunker Bay. The park’s coastline faces north east, which is rare in Western Australia, therefore it is sheltered from prevailing salt bearing south westerly winds, and so, in many places, tall trees and dense vegetation grows down to the water’s edge.

READ MORE

The Aboriginal name Meelup – “place of the moon rising” comes from the full moon appearing to rise out of the sea on a few days of the year. The park offers excellent recreation facilities among pristine coastal bushland and has a stunning visual landscape, due to its protected coastline and the stark contrast between the rustic granite outcrops and turquoise ocean.

Meelup Beach is a place that features in many happy holiday memories. The gentle calm water, spacious white sand beach and the big shady park with barbecues and picnic benches makes it a favourite spot for family picnics and swimming. It would be hard to find a beach more perfect for families with little kids!

On most days – especially hot summery days – Meelup Beach is completely sheltered from wind and waves. The water is crystal-clear and calm as a swimming pool. The white sandy seafloor slopes away gradually into the deeper water where you can anchor your boat, if you have one.

There is no vehicular access on beaches. Camping, pets, fires and off-road vehicles are not permitted. Gas barbeques are provided at Meelup Beach and Castle Bay.

QUINNINUP FALLS
Quinninup Falls, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

The journey to Quinninup Falls is every bit as beautiful as the falls themselves but while the walk is very rewarding it can be somewhat physically challenging.

As a guide it takes approximately 45 minutes to walk to the falls and almost an hour to walk back, depending on your fitness level and age of your children. Also factor in time to spend exploring the falls.

READ MORE

To get to the falls park your car at the Moses Road carpark. On your left you will see toilets and a viewing platform and to the right is the path to the falls. At the start of the path there are three small wooden posts and some large bushes either side. As you are walking along keep a look out for the Cape to Cape Track signs, if you can see them you are going the right way!

The path to and from Quinninup Falls varies from flat and easy to rocky and uneven. There are also a few big sand dunes that are a breeze coming down, but physically challenging climbing up.

The view is breathtaking and well worth the effort. At the start of the walk you can see and hear the waves crashing against the shore and surfers enjoying the ocean. There is a bridge with a stream running underneath it, you then walk out into red dirt plane before the land dips and weaves and Quinninup Falls appears.

The sudden change between the ocean and sand dunes and the waterfall is almost surprising and a welcome contrast. One minute you can hear the wind and the waves crashing against the shore and then you step down into a small, quiet, green sanctuary and the sound of the rushing waterfall takes centre stage.

SUGARLOAF ROCK
Sugarloaf Rock, Mandalay Resort, Busselton, Western Australia

On the rugged coast a few kilometres south of Cape Naturaliste in the Margaret River Region, a gigantic granite rock-island looms up out of the ocean. As you approach Sugarloaf Rock you will instantly see why this towering, sea-sculptured rock that emerges from the Indian Ocean is one of the most photographed coastal landforms in the region.

READ MORE

The rock is situated within a designated nature reserve in the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park just off Cape Naturaliste near Dunsborough.

Sugarloaf Rock and the sometimes treacherous seas that pound it are best viewed from the platform. With its ever-changing colour, it is difficult to decide when it’s best to see it. Perhaps it is when the weather is stormy with crashing seas, perhaps it is when it is calm sunny and the water is crystal clear or perhaps the greatest sight is when the sun sets over the Indian Ocean and the colour of the rock changes every minute. If you wait long enough at sunset, you can even see the working Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse light up!

Its ocean side is battered by treacherous seas and the rock is separated from the coast by just a narrow channel of wild water. This has created a unique environment which is home to much wildlife.

The best place to view the rock and the crashing seas is from the elevated lookout. It is easy to get to the top with only approximately 20 steps. Due to the narrow channel of water you are quite close to the rock. But you can even get a good look from the car!

Take a closer look. Sugarloaf Rock is a bird watchers and nature lover’s paradise. As a nature reserve it is a haven for nesting sea birds and is home to the geographically restricted and graceful red-tailed tropic bird which nests here from September to February each year. But that’s not only the wildlife you may see. Playful bottlenose dolphins can often be seen leaping through the surf break close by, sometimes together with the surfers. Humpback and southern right whales are often seen wallowing, breeching or just cruising by on their migration (best time July-October)

Phone Direct & SAVE!